Friday, July 14, 2017

Speak Like a Native: 10 British Slang Words You Should Know About

Are you planning to migrate to or study or work in the UK after taking the IELTS exam? Include British slang words into your exam review practices to prepare for your life in Europe.

Complementing your review center for IELTS studies with British jargon can make your adjustment period in the UK faster. It will not only help you avoid miscommunication when you move, but it will also give you a linguistic advantage when you navigate your new environment. First-rate training facilities, like the IELTS review center in Makati, can help build up your vocabulary for your post-IELTS ventures.


Here are some common British slang terms to enhance your review center for IELTS studies.

1.    Anti-clockwise – (n.) another term for “counter-clockwise.”
Example:
The teacher asked them to pass their paper anti-clockwise.
The teacher asked them to pass their paper counter-clockwise.

2.    Grub – (n.) another term for “food.”
Example:
We’re going out to get some grub. Would you like to join us?
We’re going out to get some food. Would you like to join us?

3.    Tosh – (n.) another term for “rubbish” or “nonsense.” 
Example:
That’s a load of tosh and you know it! He won the bet fair and square.
That’s a load of trash and you know it! He won the bet fair and square.

4.    Mate – (n.) another term for “friend.”
Example:
Trust me mate; you do not want to know what happens after curfew. 
Trust me friend; you do not want to know what happens after curfew. 

5.    Rozzer – (n.) another term for “policeman.”
Example:
Though he was off-duty, the rozzer was quick to respond to the cries of help.
Though he was off-duty, the policeman was quick to respond to the cries of help.

6.    Gaffer – (n.) refers to someone who is in charge of something.
Example:
If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to approach the gaffer.
If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to approach the foreman.

7.    Dodgy – (adj.) used to describe something questionable or illegal.
Example:
He had a dodgy reputation in their neighborhood.
He had a questionable reputation in their neighborhood.

8.    Bung – (v.) to throw something.
Example:
She didn’t want to climb her apartment, so she asked her sister to bung her car keys over.
She didn’t want to climb her apartment, so she asked her sister to throw her car keys over.

9.    Nick – (v.) to steal something. 
Example:
The pigeon managed to nick a slice of bread from their basket.
The pigeon managed to steal a slice of bread from their basket.

10.    Haggle – (v.) to negotiate over a price.
Example:
The merchant was impressed with his haggling skills.
The merchant was impressed with his negotiation skills. 
Tailor your IELTS review practices to your post-exam plans. Integrate the British slang words listed above into your communication exercises to help you prepare for your life in the UK. Study with an excellent training course provider, like the IELTS review center in Makati, to learn more useful British lingo.

 
REFERENCES:
  • "50 British Slang Words & Phrases You Need to Know." Smartling. Accessed June 16, 2017. https://www.smartling.com/blog/50-british-slang-words-phrases-you-need-to-know/.
  • Etherington, Mike. "The Best of British." Slang - The Best of British. Accessed June 16, 2017. http://www.effingpot.com/chapters/slang/.
  • Haigh, Chris. "30 Awesome British Slang Terms You Should Start Using Immediately." Lifehack. Accessed June 16, 2017. http://www.lifehack.org/articles/communication/30-awesome-british-slang-terms-you-should-start-using-immediately.html.
  • Lang, Nico. "71 Simple British Slang Phrases Everyone Should Start Using." Thought Catalog. July 22, 2016. Accessed June 16, 2017. http://thoughtcatalog.com/nico-lang/2013/09/71-simple-british-slang-phrases-everyone-should-start-using/.

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